Theosophy

 

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Theosophy

The objectives of The Theosophical Society 
http://www.theosociety.org/pasadena/ts/tsobject.htm

Diffuse among men a knowledge of the laws inherent in the universe;
Promulgate the knowledge of the essential unity of all that is, and to demonstrate that this unity is fundamental in nature;
Form an active brotherhood among men;
Study ancient and modern religion, science, and philosophy;
Investigate the powers innate in man.

 

Madam Blavatsky - What She Did.

Launched the Theosophical Movement calling her message Theosophy.
First introduced knowledge of eastern religions to the West - including the ideas of karma and reincarnation.
First showed that all major religions are derived from one original religious philosophy.
Demonstrated that the ancient wisdom was still known.
Presented a portion of that ancient wisdom.
Performed phenomena not explainable by "known" laws of science.
Gave the logical basis for morality and brotherhood.
Required that the first objective of the Theosophical Movement be Universal Brotherhood without, sex, caste, or color.

 

Evidence Confirming Theosophy
http://www.blavatsky.net/confirm/ev/evidence.htm

Near Death Experiences - confirm teachings of Theosophy.
http://www.blavatsky.net/topics/near-death-experiences/near-death-experiences.htm

Wave/Particle nature of light
http://www.blavatsky.net/confirm/ev/other/photon.htm

Theosophy's Absolute and the Multiverse of Science
http://www.blavatsky.net/confirm/ev/other/multiverse.htm

Theosophy's Atlantis matched by oceanography
http://www.blavatsky.net/confirm/ev/atlantis/atlantis.htm

The ether - in this century the "vacuum" begins to resemble the ether
http://www.blavatsky.net/confirm/ev/ether/ether.htm

 

Theosophy - a checklist of Principles
http://www.blavatsky.net/theosophy/theosophy-checklist.htm

ANCIENT WISDOM knew - and continues to know - deep and vast knowledge about ourselves, our purpose in life, nature, the universe, the highest god-like principles, and man's long pre-history on this earth. Theosophy is the portion of that ancient knowledge brought to us by H. P. Blavatsky toward the end of the 19th century, as taught to her by her Teachers in Tibet.

Some of its principles are:

Everything in the universe originates from one boundless, eternal, unknowable source. After a period of manifested existence the universe returns to that source.
The universe itself is an organic whole, alive, intelligent, conscious, and divine.
The laws of nature are the result of intelligent forces.
The law of karma holds throughout the universe. It operates at all levels, ensuring justice, harmony, and balance.
We reincarnate into successive lives. Once we have reached the human level we do not regress back into animal forms.
The law of karma acts over our successive lives to ensure justice. (We don't get away with it.) We are the cause of every joy and pain in our own life.
A law of cycles provides fundamental structure at all levels. Two examples are our pattern of reincarnation, and the continuing "lives" of the universe as it appears, then returns to its source.
Analogy and correspondence provide fundamental structure for the universe. This is a broad statement of the Hermetic axiom - "As above, so below".
Evolution applies on a grand scale to all of life.
Soul gets involved in this world of matter. It experiences and learns. Soul then works its way back in a long pilgrimage to its primal source. This again follows a cyclic pattern.
This evolution achieves experience, self-awareness, and ever increasing perfection. Evolution occurs on the physical, mental, and spiritual planes.
"Survival of the fittest" along with gradual accumulation of small beneficial changes does not explain the "origin of the species". The origin of the species is due to intelligent design.
Humanity has experienced significant evolution in long periods on the continents (not islands) of Atlantis and Lemuria.
There is a seven fold constitution of man ranging from the physical plane to the purely spiritual plane.
Thoughts are tangible objects on higher planes. Every thought and action has its effect on us and on our surroundings and has a karmic consequence.
The three higher planes of this constitution form the "higher self" and that is what reincarnates from life to life and accumulates the experience, the lessons, the virtues. The lower planes form the "lower self" and are the vehicle used by the higher self while it is living in this active testing ground of incarnate life.
At the moment of death we have a review of our life just past - as we cast off this physical frame. After a short period, that varies greatly between individuals, we cast off other lower aspects of our constitution and the reincarnating self begins a long period of merciful, earned, rest before the next birth.
Often during this life, our spiritual nature is obscured in our self-centered daily lives as we cater to our immediate needs and desires. But the spiritual self is always there to guide us if we seek it with strong earnest desire.
We can strive to reach our higher self by:
Listening to our still small voice of conscience.
Noting the dreams from the higher self.
Developing our intuition.
Meditating.
Studying principles of the Wisdom Religion.
Aligning ourselves with Nature.
Engaging in action for the greater good.
Carefully reading the events of our daily life.
Brotherhood is a fact in nature. We are ONE at the highest spiritual component of our nature. We are sparks from one flame. We are the fingers on one hand. We are ONE at other levels as well.
We should:
Understand we are not separate from humanity or the world.
Emphasize brotherhood, altruism, and compassion in our daily lives.
Strive to know our higher self.
As a guiding rule - act for and as the Self of All.
The religions of the world are branches on the tree whose trunk is the one ancient - once universal - wisdom religion. The religions are the tributaries of one great river. (But they borrow from each other to make the actual details much more complex.)
Mythology often transmits some of this knowledge in symbolic form.
Periodically, great teachers come amongst us to help us in this evolutionary path. They may create another branch on the tree.
Humanity's potential is infinite and every being has a contribution to make toward a grander world. We are all in it together. We are one.

_______________________________________

Some excerpts 

I was sent to America on purpose and sent to the Eddies. There I found Olcott in love with spirits, . . . I was ordered to let him know that spiritual phenomena without the philosophy of Occultism were dangerous and misleading. I proved to him that all that mediums could do through spirits others could do at will without any spirits at all; that bells and thought-reading, raps and physical phenomena, could be achieved by anyone who had a faculty of acting in his physical body through the organs of his astral body; and I had that faculty ever since I was four years old, as all my family know. I could make furniture move and objects fly apparently, and my astral arms that supported them remained invisible; all this ever before I knew even of Masters. -- The Path, X, 369, March 1896

The Master K.H. explains that:

". . . it is not against true Spiritualism that we set ourselves, but only against indiscriminate mediumship and -- physical manifestations, -- materializations and trance-possessions especially. . . . it is the Occultists and the Theosophists who are true Spiritualists, while the modern sect of that name is composed simply of materialistic phenomenalists. -- Mahatma Letters, 113-14

In regard to more recent charges in connection with the Masters' letters, C. Jinarajadasa has done good service in publishing his Did Madame Blavatsky Forge the Mahatma Letters? in which he gives photographic copies of letters from various Mahatmas, a study which shows the striking differences between them, and demonstrates the marked individuality of their characters. In presenting these facts, he gives unanswerable evidence that H.P.B. was in some cases thousands of miles away from the places where the letters were written, or received, or both, and that it was physically impossible for her to have written them.

1. Nirmanakaya is the Sanskrit name for a highly advanced Adept who has evolved beyond the need of a physical body, and while living on the plane of being next superior to the physical one, yet remains closely in contact with mankind in order to help by continually instilling thoughts of spiritual and moral beauty into the hearts of men

"Accept the explanations and teachings of Occultism, and, the blind inertia of physical Science being replaced by the intelligent active Powers behind the veil of matter, motion and inertia become subservient to those Powers. It is on the doctrine of the illusive nature of matter, and the infinite divisibility of the atom, that the whole science of Occultism is built. It opens limitless horizons to substance informed by the divine breath of its soul in every possible state of tenuity, states still undreamt of by the most spiritually disposed chemists and physicists." -- S.D., I, 519-20

The Mahatmas must not be confused with minor adepts, lamas, yogis, or hermits in India or Tibet, such as are described by ancient and modern travelers who have met them on rare occasions. The Masters, as they are frequently called, stand far higher in spiritual and intellectual knowledge. The highest grade of Adepts have passed beyond the need of physical imbodiment, though their superior spiritual and intellectual wisdom is devoted to the welfare of mankind.

The theosophical ideal of brotherhood is neither visionary nor impracticable, though it will, of course, take a long time to realize. It is not limited to philanthropic, intellectual, or economic endeavor as commonly understood. Though it includes these activities, it implies something deeper. The form of brotherhood which it was hoped would spread gradually till it covers the earth must begin with the work and example of a body of men and women who have a profound desire to benefit humanity by giving out ideas which will change men's minds by changing their hearts, ideas based on the belief that this world is not an accident, that men are not creatures of chance with no past and no future, but that law and order reign in nature. In brief, to live in brotherly union is the only way to become truly human, because it is the fundamental basis on which the universe is built, and man is an indissoluble part of the universe. Brotherhood -- interdependence -- as a universal principle in nature is not a mere sentiment, and theosophy is not a sentimental or emotional system, but strictly scientific, as well as religious and philosophical. The universal tradition of a Golden Age is perhaps only a dream of the past, but it is the reality of the future; and if the constructive ideals of theosophy, the ancient wisdom, were universally practiced it would be here today.

The epoch in which the Theosophical Society appeared was one of confusion of ideas in the West, when the mental field was being plowed in preparation for the new cycle of transition in nearly every aspect of life. A few learned scholars in the West had begun to study and translate Oriental literature; a few liberal thinkers were courageously suggesting that the ancient philosophies of India and China were something better than "heathen foolishness"; Emerson was diffusing some of the light from the East. But few except specialists knew anything about the Eastern wisdom, and still fewer attached any importance to its spiritual significance. Hinduism was regarded as rank superstition and Buddhism as pure materialism or at best agnosticism. Max Muller was teaching that nirvana was annihilation!

Reincarnation was practically unheard-of in the West, or was misinterpreted as transmigration into animals. The law of karma (cause and effect) which makes a man responsible for his own destiny by challenging him "to work out his own salvation" had long been obscured by misleading notions like the vicarious atonement and the remission of sins by priestly mediation.

Science, in its heyday of materialism and self-exaltation, while quite properly breaking down medieval superstitions and illogical dogmas, was also, unfortunately, undermining the belief in the reality of man's spiritual nature. Darwinian evolution was replacing the Christian theory of the creation of man in the image of God by the mechanistic natural selection and survival of the fittest hypothesis. Thoughtful minds who were trying to harmonize the hard facts of science with spiritual interpretations of the universe were in difficulties. Even in India the established creeds were threatened.

Fortunately, however, freedom of thought was no longer prohibited, and new ideas were allowed a hearing. Therefore, when scientific materialism seemed on the eve of triumph, an audacious challenge was thrown by spiritualism. It at least demonstrated the existence of invisible and ethereal planes of substance and of life, other than the physical plane to which materialistic science then limited its universe, built of "hard billiard-ball atoms."

Several distinguished scientists, such as Crookes and Hare the chemists, Wallace the biologist, Wagner the geologist, Flammarion the astronomer, and a few others, with rare courage dared to look into psychic research and to satisfy themselves that some truth lay behind the claims of the spiritualists. The latter, however, offered no adequate philosophy or scientific analysis of their phenomena and, like their contemporaries in other fields, they never dreamed that the subject had already been thoroughly explored in past ages by advanced and fearless Oriental thinkers and other ancient researchers who had found that the phenomena fitted into a legitimate place in the scheme of natural law.

Even in the domain of the arts there was hardly any rational appreciation of the extraordinary greatness and the subtle spiritual background of Oriental accomplishment in that field, which is now so much more intelligently understood in the West.

Amid this welter of contending elements the Theosophical Society made its appearance, a strange meteor from an unseen source destined to make a far greater stir than its first modest proceedings suggested. As the famous French Orientalist, Burnouf, remarked, Theosophy was one of the three most important movements of the age. It fulfilled Schopenhauer's prediction that the most significant event of the nineteenth century would be, in the judgment of posterity, the introduction of the religious philosophy of the East to the notice of the West.

While scholars were mostly studying the technical side of Sanskrit literature, the theosophical movement brought the higher spiritual interpretation of it to the Western world.

A "New Order of Ages" (1) was at hand, and the Theosophical Society brought one entirely new idea, hitherto obscured, to the West: the actual existence on earth of perfected men, masters of life, elder brothers of mankind. Though many, or perhaps most, of these advanced Intelligences live and work on planes of being invisible to ordinary sight, they are not spirits in the ordinary sense, nor supernatural, though they are superhuman. They are the natural products of human evolution, though they have outdistanced their fellow men. Not only did theosophy proclaim their existence as facts and ideals, but it said that at certain cyclic periods they sent messengers to the world to revive its waning spirituality, and to strike the note of universal brotherhood anew.

H. P. Blavatsky challenged the Western world with a formulated plan in which the universe was shown as a cosmos of order and of conscious activity, not an unreasoning or unreasoned chaos, and that man is, and always has been, an inseparable part of the universe, no accidental visitor here today and gone tomorrow. She showed that while the archaic wisdom, preserved and handed down by the Guardians of the human race, is found hidden under worldwide symbol, allegory and legend, it was plainly though secretly taught in the schools of the Mysteries, whose portals even today will open to earnest and unselfish workers who give the right knock.

The Theosophical Society was organized in 1875 by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, Henry Steel Olcott, William Quan Judge, and others, under the authority of certain Mahatmas or Masters of wisdom belonging to the highest Lodge of Adepts, as an agent or instrument through which the influence of the Theosophical Movement could reach humanity. The primary object of the movement is to bring about a universal brotherhood based upon the essential divinity of man.

The movement is greater than any society, for it includes and employs many organizations and agents, but if they become fossilized in dogma or betray their original purpose, the spirit of theosophy can no longer use them.

Theosophical literature contains, therefore, only a very partial presentation of a cosmic scheme which is far beyond ordinary human comprehension. There are, however, a few very highly evolved men who have penetrated more deeply behind the veil of nature and have realized, through initiation into the Mysteries, a far greater understanding of theosophia, the divine wisdom. Such men are called Mahatmas or Rishis in India, and those of the highest grade are believed to have attained the most sublime wisdom and knowledge that is possible for humanity in this stage of evolution. The Mahatmas must not be confused with minor adepts, lamas, yogis, or hermits in India or Tibet, such as are described by ancient and modern travelers who have met them on rare occasions. The Masters, as they are frequently called, stand far higher in spiritual and intellectual knowledge. The highest grade of Adepts have passed beyond the need of physical imbodiment, though their superior spiritual and intellectual wisdom is devoted to the welfare of mankind.

A "New Order of Ages" (1) was at hand, and the Theosophical Society brought one entirely new idea, hitherto obscured, to the West: the actual existence on earth of perfected men, masters of life, elder brothers of mankind. Though many, or perhaps most, of these advanced Intelligences live and work on planes of being invisible to ordinary sight, they are not spirits in the ordinary sense, nor supernatural, though they are superhuman. They are the natural products of human evolution, though they have outdistanced their fellow men. Not only did theosophy proclaim their existence as facts and ideals, but it said that at certain cyclic periods they sent messengers to the world to revive its waning spirituality, and to strike the note of universal brotherhood anew. Furthermore, the unseen helpers, the "Guardian Wall" of humanity, were prepared to share a portion of their knowledge of the hidden laws of the universe with those whose lives proved that they were worthy and well qualified to receive it. Above all, theosophy brought the good tidings that the Mahatmas are nothing more than what every one of us may become in time if he will.

H. P. Blavatsky challenged the Western world with a formulated plan in which the universe was shown as a cosmos of order and of conscious activity, not an unreasoning or unreasoned chaos, and that man is, and always has been, an inseparable part of the universe, no accidental visitor here today and gone tomorrow. She showed that while the archaic wisdom, preserved and handed down by the Guardians of the human race, is found hidden under worldwide symbol, allegory and legend, it was plainly though secretly taught in the schools of the Mysteries, whose portals even today will open to earnest and unselfish workers who give the right knock.

The history of the Theosophical Society is intimately interwoven with that of a few prominent men and women who have in various ways helped or hindered its progress. By far the most important personality is, of course, the founder of the Society, but the limitations of this brief outline do not permit a detailed and exhaustive study of her personal history. The simple facts about her life and character, however, stated and considered just as they are found, are a sufficient refutation of the unfounded libels and misrepresentations by which unthinking and occasionally vindictive writers from her time to our own have attempted to belittle if not destroy both her reputation and her life work.

The Masters had seen that the long-separated East and West were being brought into close communication on prosaic commercial, economic, and political lines, and that the East would become dazzled by the brilliant materialism of Western progress. They saw that the hour had struck to anticipate the danger of the coming interchange of materialistic thought and ideals with the psychic lure of the acquirement of the lower yoga powers -- a contact on lower lines fraught with disaster for both sides. To counteract this danger, they planned to strike a strong keynote on the higher lines of human welfare. They started their unique work by training H. P. Blavatsky, as a European, to bring the Western initiative and energy to awaken the East from its spiritual lethargy and to share with the world some of the buried treasures of the ancient wisdom. To prepare for a society which should be a nucleus of a universal brotherhood, she took her long and adventurous journeys in distant lands in order to gain necessary experience and knowledge of human life. Traveling under the occult supervision of her Master, she found her way to places and had the entree to sources of secret lore which were not open even to accredited explorers or to learned researchers.

In Canada she came in touch with the American Indians, and learned something of the secrets of their medicine men. In New Orleans, where she investigated Voodoo rites, she was in great danger and had to be warned by her Master to leave quickly. She then proceeded to Texas where she met an old French Canadian, Pere Jacques, who took care of her for some time and saved her from serious perils. As her knowledge of English was limited, a protector with whom she could speak freely must have been very helpful. Mexico was the scene of her next adventures, and here she met a Hindu chela of her Master, whose protection was quite necessary in that unsettled country. Accompanied by this chela and another student of mystical subjects, whom she had arranged to meet in the West Indies, she sailed for India. Here she made an abortive attempt to enter Tibet, for she was turned back by the British officer commanding a frontier district. Many years after, in India, the account of her failure was confirmed to Colonel Olcott by the officer himself, Major-General Murray, who said that H.P.B. had to be detained a month in his house in his wife's company (O. D. L., I, 265).

Leaving India, she visited Singapore and Java, and finally reached England. Finding that preparations were being made for the Crimean War involving England, France, and Russia, she, being a Russian subject, departed for the United States (1854), landing in New York and then went to Chicago. Crossing the Rocky Mountains with emigrants' caravans she reached San Francisco, where it is said that she met her Master again. Witnesses have declared that the local newspapers mentioned her name, and published stories of an unusually tall and distinguished Hindu who attracted great attention when he appeared in public. Unfortunately documentary evidence is lacking, because the great San Francisco fire destroyed the files of the papers, and inquiry has, so far, failed to discover a single copy elsewhere.

Once more she set forth for the Orient, and in 1855 she reached India again, where she met a German friend of her father, an ex-Lutheran minister named Kulwein. A party was organized with the object of penetrating into Tibet, but H. P. Blavatsky was the only member of it who succeeded. Little is known of her experiences in Tibet on this occasion, except what is so interestingly described in Isis Unveiled. After surmounting many difficulties and having many adventures, she was finally rescued from a most critical position and conducted back to the Indian frontier. She tells of the advanced telepathic methods by which the shaman who was her guide called for assistance:

We had directed the Shaman's inner ego to the same friend heretofore mentioned in this chapter, the Kutchi of Lha-Ssa, who travels constantly to British India and back. We know that he was apprised of our critical situation in the desert; for a few hours later came help, and we were rescued by a party of twenty-five horsemen who had been directed by their chief to find us at the place where we were, which no living man endowed with common powers could have known. The chief of this escort was a Shaberon, an "adept" whom we had never seen before, nor did we after that, for he never left his soumay (lamasery), and we could have no access to it. But he was a personal friend of the Kutchi. -- Isis Unveiled, II, 628

H. P. Blavatsky adds that the above will of course provoke nothing but incredulity in the reader, but it is only an example of the "Illimitable powers and possibilities of the human astral soul." Today, when we have innumerable evidences of highly advanced telepathy among so-called primitive races, such as the American Indians, African peoples, Australian aborigines, Eskimos, etc., she would not have to face the ridicule and abuse she then suffered for daring to fly in the face of conventional public opinion. The increasing number of sensitives in every part of the world is so noticeable today that disbelief in telepathy and clairvoyance is becoming absurd and a sign of ignorance.

This shows the definite object for which the Masters started the Society -- a center of spiritual energy which would be both philosophic and religious and, it might be said, scientific. It was not intended to be a mere "psychical research" association, however glorified. H.P.B. knew this perfectly, as can be seen from her letters to her friend Professor Corson of Cornell University, but it was not so obvious to others until some time after the Theosophical Society was established

One of the Masters was seen by Olcott walking in Cannon Street. This Master later called at the house of Mrs. Hollis Billing where H.P.B. was staying, and had a conversation with the latter. Mrs. Billing was a medium of an unusual type who became a faithful supporter of H.P.B. Much is written about her in the Masters' letters and those of H. P. Blavatsky, and W. Q. Judge mentions her with appreciation. Two English members, Miss Rosa Bates and Mr. E. Wimbridge, were added to the party of travelers, but they soon lost interest and resigned not long after they arrived in India.

I said to him [Olcott] that I had known Adepts, the "Brothers, "not only in India and beyond Ladakh, but in Egypt and Syria, -- for there are "Brothers" there to this day. . . . That, whether they were called Rosicrucians, Kabalists, or Yogis -- Adepts were everywhere Adepts -- silent, secret, retiring, and who would never divulge themselves entirely to anyone, unless one did as I did -- passed seven and ten years probation (1) and given proofs of absolute devotion, and that he, or she, would keep silent even before a prospect and a threat of death. . . . All I was allowed to say was -- the truth: There is beyond the Himalayas a nucleus of Adepts, of various nationalities; and the Teschu Lama knows them, and they act together, and some of them are with him and yet remain unknown in their true character even to the average lamas . . . My Master and K.H. and several others I know personally are there, coming and going, and they are all in communication with Adepts in Egypt and Syria, and even Europe. -- The Path, X, 369-70, March 1896

It may not be an accidental concurrence, if true, as some modern writers on Indian mysticism declare, that there is far more spirituality on the whole in southern India than in other parts of the country. However this may be, the "Holy Man of Benares," Swami Bhaskarananda Saraswati, a chela of one of H.P.B.'s Masters, and later known to Katherine Tingley who visited him in his asrama, lived in more northern parts. He was a noble and learned representative of the highest class of yogis working openly, but even such outstanding men as he are only on the way to the spiritual altitudes of the fully initiated Mahatmas who inspired the theosophical movement, and whose work and lives are consecrated to the whole of humanity.

How, then, are such helpers to be found? They put it plainly thus:

. . . nothing draws us to any outsider save his evolving spirituality. He may be a Bacon or an Aristotle in knowledge, and still not even make his current felt a feather's weight by us, if his power is confined to the Manas. The supreme energy resides in the Buddhi; latent -- when wedded to Atman alone, active and irresistible when galvanized by the essence of "Manas" and when none of the dross of the latter commingles with that pure essence to weigh it down by its finite nature. Manas, pure and simple, is of a lower degree, and of the earth earthly: and so your greatest men count but as nonentities in the arena where greatness is measured by the standard of spiritual development. -- Mahatma Letters, 341-2
I can come nearer to you, but you must draw me by a purified heart and a gradually developing will. Like the needle the adept follows his attractions. . . .
If you hear seldom from me, never feel disappointed, my Brother, but say -- "It is my fault." . . . your thought will find me if projected by a pure impulse, . . . Like the light in the sombre valley seen by the mountaineer from his peaks, every bright thought in your mind, my Brother, will sparkle and attract the attention of your distant friend and correspondent. If thus we discover our natural Allies in the Shadow-world -- your world and ours outside the precincts -- and it is our law to approach every such an one if even there be but the feeblest glimmer of the true "Tathagata" light within him -- then how far easier for you to attract us. Understand this and the admission into the Society of persons often distasteful to you will no longer amaze you. -- Ibid., 266-8

Gradually, and without strain, Damodar found inner powers awakening quite naturally and becoming available for use in his increasing responsibilities. Olcott describes this development with appreciation and sympathy. He gives instances showing the increase in Damodar's power of communication with the Masters and H.P.B. at great distances, in general clairvoyance, and in other supernormal powers. This young chela was also able at times to make remarkable cures by magnetic healing. By the year 1883, it was possible for the Master to employ him to transmit his messages by "astral mail." As in the case of all advanced souls who have killed out personal egotism and transmuted desire into spiritual energy, the occult powers that emerged into activity were perfectly normal under the conditions. They had not been ambitiously coveted, or sought for personal gratification, and they were never displayed to the mere curiosity seeker, nor exhibited as inducements to join the Society. Such a proceeding is utterly opposed to the principles of theosophy, though:

If we have had one we certainly have had an hundred intimations from strangers that they were ready to join at once if they could be sure that they would shortly be endowed with siddhis, or the power to work occult phenomena. -- "Editorial Notice" in The Theosophist, II, 85, Jan. 1881

For those who might doubt the existence of high Adepts living on the physical plane, the evidence of Damodar is valuable, because he gives firsthand testimony in writing of several experiences which cannot be explained away. In November 1883, at Lahore, he met the Master K.H., and a little later he spent a few days with the Masters at their asrama in Kashmir. When in Ceylon with H. P. Blavatsky and Colonel Olcott in 1880, a Master took him to an asrama on a small island where he had a long conversation with another Adept who was living there. Details of this and other similar events are given in two letters of great interest written by Damodar to Mr. Judge, and published in The Theosophical Forum for November 1932, and April 1933.

The Committee of the Psychical Research Society made no proper effort to understand the background of the problem of H.P.B. They ignored the available firsthand evidence regarding her astonishing childhood and youth, so inextricably associated with psychic and occult phenomena and with her claim that she was helped by the Masters who were invisible to others and yet were not "spirits." They ignored her serious studies in Oriental philosophies and her strenuous efforts to revive Sanskrit learning, which were publicly and gratefully recognized by competent scholars. They paid no attention to the fact that the Brahmans, jealous of their secret knowledge, recognized that she possessed many of their guarded teachings which include the laws governing the employment of occult powers. Nor did they consider certain striking teachings on scientific matters by her and her Masters and their chelas, which in all reason should have appealed to serious investigators who really wished to understand the problem before them. By disdainfully ignoring this line of inquiry the S.P.R. missed a great opportunity; for although certain scientific teachings of theosophy were unsuspected in 1885 many of them have since been discovered by scientific research, and others have become promising subjects of intensive investigation.

Links

The key to theosophy
http://www.theosociety.org/pasadena/key/key-hp.htm

Blavatsky.net - theosophy
http://www.blavatsky.net/

Theosophy on Christianity

http://www.theosociety.org/pasadena/gdpmanu/th-xity/th-xty1.htm

http://www.theosociety.org/pasadena/gdpmanu/th-xity/th-xty2.htm

Lucis Trust
http://www.metatech.org/danger_of_cell_phone_tower.html
Editor's Note: Remember that Lucifer is a light-bringer, and was very beautiful. 

More information on the Lucis Trust at:
Lucis Trust: The Spiritual Foundation of the United Nations
www.freemasonwatch.freepress-freespeech.com/lucistrust.html 

Illuminati Conspiracy Archive www.conspiracyarchive.com/

The Illuminati Page: False Prophets, Satanists or Illuminati? 
http://www.geocities.com/lord_visionary/prophetsindex.htm

Lucis Trust website www.lucistrust.org

 

 

Against Theosophy

The Ascended Masters and The New Age
http://www.lordoflight.org/the_ascended_masters.htm 

By claiming that the masters are intending to establish a spiritual Golden Age on earth, the Lucis Trust and certain other New Age organisations that have been formed or taken over by the globalists, are deliberately deceiving people. By psychologically preparing people for the coming of what they (the people) believe will be an age of peace and brotherhood, the globalists hope to ensure that there will be no opposition to its inception. It is this satanic "New World Order" that the Lord of Light has vowed to destroy eventually. It is a provable fact that a number of New Age organisations that are preparing people for the inception of a so-called golden age, are actually controlled or financed by organisations that helped bring the Nazis to power, and which supplied arms to both sides during the two world wars of the last century. 

 

Alice Bailey & Master Djwhal Khul A SATANIC COMMUNION
http://www.conspiracyarchive.com/NewAge/Alice_Bailey.htm

Lucis (Lucifer) Trust, Alice Bailey, World Goodwill and the False Light of the World
http://www.conspiracyarchive.com/NewAge/Lucis_Trust.htm

Benjamin Creme, Maitreya, the Hierarchy
of Ascended Masters and Lucifer
http://www.conspiracyarchive.com/NewAge/Creme_Maitreya.htm